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The Healing Power of Art

"Sugarmama" Shannon Steed Sigler, mixed-media and found object collages, part of a yearlong project of 365 different collages.

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Unleashing the Imagination

I paint, therefore, I am. Don’t laugh. We’re not talking philosophy. We’re talking about the benefits of connecting art with well-being.

Art is an innate force that promotes heath for the creator as well as the viewer. To wit: author Elizabeth Gilbert writes the bestselling memoir, Eat, Love, Pray, and is enlightened by the act of writing. Those who love Gilbert’s book say they are enlightened as well.

Upon seeing the original of a sculpted masterpiece for the first time, an art-lover can be stunned into breathlessness—a physical and emotional connection. After playing a concerto to perfection, the classical musician is drained and the audience feels uplifted spiritually—they get chills, for heaven’s sake. Theatre, likewise, has drawn people to its stage lights for the same reason—the exchange of energy between performer and audience. One’s life is better for having done and seen art like this. There’s a release, a catharsis, on both sides.

“Art and healing are lovers, tied together with a silver thread.”
- Dr. Mike Samuels

In The Critique of Judgment (1790), Immanuel Kant wrote that the arts have transformative powers to change a person’s outlook and the way we experience the world. In contemporary studies, it has been proven that art and music can affect a person’s brain wave patterns, the nervous system and even the cells in the body, and it has the power to promote healing by altering a person’s immune system. >>>

 

 

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