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Profiles In Healing

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How do we heal? And what defines the path toward true and total health? Western medicine treats what ails us, while spiritual practices direct us to look within for illumination. But where do we look to better understand our total health, the health that cannot be tested in a lab or by a CAT scan? What defines this type of health and how do we know when we have achieved it? With these thoughts in mind, we gathered a cross section of individuals within the Valley’s healing community. Our goal: to better understand the components and options of well-being available to us. Some are firmly grounded in science, with years of statistical data to support the theories; others are centered on ancient traditions and their thousands of years of inherited knowledge. What we discovered was an array of practices that we have tried to illuminate through the words of the people who devote their lives to healing. These individuals represent but a small selection of the many dedicated and talented doctors and health and wellness practitioners in the Valley. They follow different disciplines—from Doctor of Medicine to Yogi—but a common purpose unites them all: to help us empower ourselves to make the conscious and active decisions that will better our health and help to balance the essential parts of our being—mind, body and spirit.

 


SPIRIT/FAITH

Lea Flocchini Morgan

 

“People come to me because they are not happy in some area of their lives. They have blocks that are preventing contentment. My job is to be their guide—essentially, I try to get ‘out of the way’ and create a safe and sacred environment to explore and develop their own inner wisdom and insight. My goal is to bring the sacred into partnership with them. I don’t define it; that is not my place and I can’t—it’s too individual. Rather, I invite them to seek the sacred, to explore spirit and somehow, to activate it.” Lea Flocchini Morgan defines optimum health in the context of spiritual balance—the need to remember and redefine what is truly important in our lives. To her, spirit “gives us that sense of wonder and awe.” It is the desire to become a better human being. Morgan is a healing counselor, and she sees her work manifesting like single drops on still water—rippling and radiating from each person outward until they begin to overlap. When a patient finds her balance, she treats others with more kindness, and the spirit spreads. >>>

 

 

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